Analogy



Analogy : Reasoning

Definition : Simple meaning of analogy is similarity or correspondence or having same feautres.

In questions based on analogy, a particular relationship is g iven and
another similar relationship has to be identified from the alternatives
provided. Questions based on analogy are set up to test a candidate’s overall
knowledge, power of reasoning and ability to think.

These types of questions cover every types of relationships that one can
think. There are many ways of establishing a relationship like quantity and
unit, worker and tools, cause and effect, word-synonym, word-antonym,
country and capital, state and capital, country and currency, animal and the
young ones (kid), male and female, animals and their resting places, games
and places of playing, occupation their working place and their work.

Here, some relationships are given, which are useful for solving questions
based on analogy

Country-Capital-and-their-currency
Occupation-working-place-and-their-work

Direct objects : Direct objects are what receive the action of the verb in a sentence or clause.

For example:
• “The dog chased its tail.” (The noun tail is receiving the action of the verb chase.)

• “Mary reads a book every week.” (The noun book is receiving the action of the verb read.)

Indirect objects : An indirect object is the person or thing who receives the direct object of the verb. For instance:

• “Please pass Jeremy the salt.” (The proper noun Jeremy is receiving the direct object salt, which receives the action of the verb pass.)

• “I sent the company an application for the job.” (The noun company is receiving the direct object application, which receives the action of the verb sent.)

Objects of prepositions : Nouns are also used after prepositions to create prepositional phrases. When a noun is part of a prepositional phrase, it is known as the object of the preposition. For example:

• “Your backpack is under the table.” (The noun table is the object of the preposition under, which creates the prepositional phrase under the table.)

• “I am looking for work.” (The noun work is the object of the preposition for, which creates the prepositional phrase for work.)

Predicate Nouns : Nouns that follow linking verbs are known as predicate nouns (sometimes known as predicative nouns). These serve to rename or re-identify the subject. If the noun is accompanied by any direct modifiers (such as articles, adjectives, or prepositional phrases), the entire noun phrase acts predicatively.
For example:
• “Love is a virtue.” (The noun phrase a virtue follows the linking verb is to
rename the subject love.)
• “Tommy seems like a real bully.” (The noun phrase a real bully follows the
linking verb seems to rename the subject Tommy.)
• “Maybe this is a blessing in disguise.” (The noun phrase a blessing in disguise
follows the linking verb is to rename the subject this.)
(Go to the section on Subject Complements in the part of the guide that covers
Syntax to learn more about predicate nouns.)